Vega trim

General information about Wing42's Lockheed Vega.
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Tailspin45
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Vega trim

Post by Tailspin45 » 14 Oct 2018, 20:31

Jarek wrote:
09 Jul 2018, 00:49
...
4. And finally - this big wodden lever on the right - seems common to all Vega's - looks like elevator trim. There is a plate near with Nose up/Nose down marks and instructions about wobble pump in the middle...
https://www.thehenryford.org/collection ... act/411416
https://www.thehenryford.org/collection ... act/411417
That large wooden lever is trim. The crank mechanism was a newfangled addition in the Detroit-Lockheeds, but serves us well in the sim where we use trim_up or trim_down (repeat while held) for buttons

Just found a wonderful article on the Vega in the Sept 1965 edition of Flying magazine written by movie stuntman Frank Talman that refers to the lever as trim. Lots of other helpful details, too, especially about performance with a 300hp P&W.
Last edited by Tailspin45 on 15 Oct 2018, 15:43, edited 1 time in total.

Jarek
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Re: Vega trim

Post by Jarek » 14 Oct 2018, 22:41

Ha! interesting... So this is Johnson bar. So now new question what is the purpose of this big wooden crank on right hand side...
So it seems that parking brake is not used here (?)

Lot of useful info in addition - I was trying to find something about this "hat box" where stick is falling onto. So now we know tat it is starting solenoid.
Performance data is still useful. This is for Wasp Junior, but could be upscaled.

I also proposed to remove this lamp on right hand side -as this description confirmed that it is located close to your face, about on your eye level. Not something convenient for flying, not only at night ;-)

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Tailspin45
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Re: Vega trim

Post by Tailspin45 » 14 Oct 2018, 23:20

Johnson bar, apparently is actually a railroading term named after a Baldwin Locomotive engineer who apparently really used "jouncin' " meaning jouncing or bouncing. The long throttle and brake levers in the locomotive cab apparently bounced around quite a bit at speed.

In the Ford Tri-Motor there's a lever between the pilot and copilot seat they call the Johnson Bar. Pull straight back you get both brakes, pull back and right you get just right brake. Back and left you get left brake.

Yes, that lamp is more of a floodlight for use getting in or out of the cockpit, I suspect. Not a good place for it for use in flight (especially since it isn't red).

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